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Poultry industry loses some market to the U.S.









October 2, 2018 - The egg concession under the new trade deal with the U.S. - 10 million dozen additional imports - will kick in the first year the deal takes effect, which depends on going through U.S. Senate approvals and regulatory processes.


Starting in year two, the market access for American eggs will increase by one per cent each year for the next 10 years.


The chicken concession more than doubles the market access the U.S. would have gained under the Trans-Pacific Partnership deal from which it withdrew.


The access now will be 57,000 tonnes phased in over six years, compared with the TPP at 27,000 metric tonnes phased in over 19 years. Starting in year seven of this deal, the chicken access also will increase by one per cent each year for the next 10 years.


This, says Chicken Farmers of Ontario, comes on top of the additional access granted under the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement and the existing World Trade Organization access, representing more than 10.7 per cent of our existing production.


The turkey industry issued a news release saying it is still in the dark about any changes that impact it from the new trade agreement among Canada, the United States and Mexico.


The Canadian Hatching Egg Producers (CHEP) said the agreement has maintained the same level for broiler hatching egg and chick tariff rate quotas (TRQs) as under NAFTA.


The level of access remains unchanged at 17.4 per cent per year for broiler hatching eggs and 3.7 per cent for broiler chicks.


Dairy loses its Class 7 pricing defense against duty-free imports of diafiltered milk and must yield 3.5 per cent more of the domestic market to the U.S. dairy industry.